"The Big Picture Escapes Me," 2015, acrylic on found wood, 64 x 84"

“The Big Picture Escapes Me,” 2015, acrylic on found wood, 64 x 84″

The art I am loving this week.

Chris Johanson, “Equations” at Altman Siegel, San Francisco (through Dec. 19): I have long enjoyed Chris Johanson’s work, and with this show of new work, all paintings on found wood, he delivers again. I had the privilege of writing about his last show at Altman Siegel for Art Practical, and many of those words still apply: “This selection of brightly colored . . . paintings continue in the naïve, raw style that has earned the self-taught Johanson, a former graffiti artist, critical praise and recognition as part of San Francisco’s street-inspired Mission School. Here again, Johanson’s aesthetic is simple, direct, and rough. The . . . paintings are childlike in their hand-hewn simplicity.” Also notable about the work is that, while the aesthetic may be naïvethere is a definite outsider art feelthe subjects and design are complex.

NEAT: New Experiments in Art and Technology” at the Contemporary Jewish Museum, San Francisco (through Jan. 17): This show explores the Bay Area’s influence on bringing technology and science to the practice of art. It features new or updated work by such notable artists as Jim Campbell (whose work is currently also featured in a show at the San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art; see below), Paul DeMarinis, Alan Rath, and Paolo Salvagione (Salvagione also worked with CJM Chief Curator Renny Pritikin as a curatorial consultant on the show). This show very much lives up to its name on many levels. The museum also created an excellent digital catalog for the show that features essays, artist interview videos, stills from the show, and more.

Jim Campbell, “New Work & Collaborations with Jane Rosen” at the San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art, San Jose (through Feb. 14, 2016): In this immersive show of new light works by the internationally recognized Bay Area artist Jim Campbell, he explores ideas of blurring and fracturing the image (even into three-dimensional space), as a counterpoint to technology going to higher and higher resolution. He has also worked with glass sculptor Jane Rosen to create meditative, glowing pieces.

Lisa Kokin, “10 Years in the Making: Lisa Kokin at Seager Gray Gallery” at Seager Gray Gallery, Mill Valley (through Dec. 6): This show takes place in the small back area of Seager Gray, but don’t let its size or location fool you: this intimate display is front row incredible. As the title implies, these textile- and book-based pieces range in terms of year created, as do they in execution; Kokin is an artist of many talents (so much so, if not informed otherwise, one could easily think this was a group show). Consistent are they though in excellence: delicate, intricate, fun, beautiful, smart.

Upcoming!

Performance at the Contemporary Jewish Museum, San Francisco, December 3, 6:30 to 9:30 p.m.: “New Experiments in Art and Sound.”

Opening November 19 in Oakland: Sanjay Vora, “Lost Love” at Vessel Gallery. An opening reception will take place Thursday, November 19, 6 to 8 p.m. An artist talk will take place December 12 at 2 p.m.

 

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