November 2015


"The Big Picture Escapes Me," 2015, acrylic on found wood, 64 x 84"

“The Big Picture Escapes Me,” 2015, acrylic on found wood, 64 x 84″

The art I am loving this week.

Chris Johanson, “Equations” at Altman Siegel, San Francisco (through Dec. 19): I have long enjoyed Chris Johanson’s work, and with this show of new work, all paintings on found wood, he delivers again. I had the privilege of writing about his last show at Altman Siegel for Art Practical, and many of those words still apply: “This selection of brightly colored . . . paintings continue in the naïve, raw style that has earned the self-taught Johanson, a former graffiti artist, critical praise and recognition as part of San Francisco’s street-inspired Mission School. Here again, Johanson’s aesthetic is simple, direct, and rough. The . . . paintings are childlike in their hand-hewn simplicity.” Also notable about the work is that, while the aesthetic may be naïvethere is a definite outsider art feelthe subjects and design are complex.

NEAT: New Experiments in Art and Technology” at the Contemporary Jewish Museum, San Francisco (through Jan. 17): This show explores the Bay Area’s influence on bringing technology and science to the practice of art. It features new or updated work by such notable artists as Jim Campbell (whose work is currently also featured in a show at the San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art; see below), Paul DeMarinis, Alan Rath, and Paolo Salvagione (Salvagione also worked with CJM Chief Curator Renny Pritikin as a curatorial consultant on the show). This show very much lives up to its name on many levels. The museum also created an excellent digital catalog for the show that features essays, artist interview videos, stills from the show, and more.

Jim Campbell, “New Work & Collaborations with Jane Rosen” at the San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art, San Jose (through Feb. 14, 2016): In this immersive show of new light works by the internationally recognized Bay Area artist Jim Campbell, he explores ideas of blurring and fracturing the image (even into three-dimensional space), as a counterpoint to technology going to higher and higher resolution. He has also worked with glass sculptor Jane Rosen to create meditative, glowing pieces.

Lisa Kokin, “10 Years in the Making: Lisa Kokin at Seager Gray Gallery” at Seager Gray Gallery, Mill Valley (through Dec. 6): This show takes place in the small back area of Seager Gray, but don’t let its size or location fool you: this intimate display is front row incredible. As the title implies, these textile- and book-based pieces range in terms of year created, as do they in execution; Kokin is an artist of many talents (so much so, if not informed otherwise, one could easily think this was a group show). Consistent are they though in excellence: delicate, intricate, fun, beautiful, smart.

Upcoming!

Performance at the Contemporary Jewish Museum, San Francisco, December 3, 6:30 to 9:30 p.m.: “New Experiments in Art and Sound.”

Opening November 19 in Oakland: Sanjay Vora, “Lost Love” at Vessel Gallery. An opening reception will take place Thursday, November 19, 6 to 8 p.m. An artist talk will take place December 12 at 2 p.m.

 

Advertisements
Barry McGee, from "China Boo" at Ratio 3, 2015

Barry McGee, 2015

Here is a selection of some of the best exhibitions up now:

Barry McGee, “China Boo” at Ratio 3 (through Dec. 19): This show is epic, and I don’t use that word lightly. McGee is in his finest form, presenting work small and huge, riffing off old favorites, and pushing color and pattern to eye-dizzying glory. There is also a spectacular show within a show, the result of some fortuitous timing and massive collaboration. I’ll say no more, as to not ruin the surprise, aside from, Do. Not. Miss. This. Show.

Sophie Calle, at Fraenkel Gallery (through Dec. 24): Using text, photography, and a project installation, Sophie Calle looks at the topics security, secrets, violence, and suicide. Tonally, work throughout runs the spectrum of white to black, lending a heavy feel to the weighty subjects covered. This show is intense, and packs a thoughtful, resonating punch. It’s the kind of show that follows you out the door.

“Jewel City: Art from San Francisco’s Panama-Pacific International Exposition” at the de Young (through Jan. 10): From my story for art, ltd. magazine about this massive show highlighting the Panama-Pacific International Exposition’s fine art component: “The show features over 200 works, most of which were shown at PPIE. Of particular note is the massive amount of research that went into creating the exhibition, the fruits of which are laid out in a thorough, copiously illustrated 400-page catalogue. ‘Until now, a clear understanding of the art historical significance of the PPIE has been obscured by its unwieldy scale … as well as the relative dearth of visual evidence of what was exhibited,” [James] Ganz [the show’s curator] notes. “The contemporary catalogues and guidebooks of paintings, sculpture, prints, and photographs were sparsely illustrated, and few gallery interiors were photographed. The curatorial team spent several years scouring archival sources and the primary and secondary literature, as well as reaching out to auction houses, museums, and private collectors with the goal of identifying a critical mass of the works shown in 1915 to arrive at a considered and coherent selection for this restaging.” This is a gorgeous and historically significant exhibition.

Julio César Morales, “Emotional Violence” at Wendi Norris Gallery (through Dec. 19): Julio Cesar Ramirez continues his exploration of border crossing and informal economies, touching on drug trafficking and human trafficking, as well as human rights violations as they pertain to displaced or undocumented peoples (think Syrian refugees), among other weighty subjects. The work is powerful, poignant, and, at times, disturbing, but always eye-opening.

Coming Soon! A selection of upcoming shows and events to watch for:

Opening this Friday in SF: Josh Jefferson, “Head Into the Trees” at Gallery 16 (Nov. 13 to Dec. 31). An opening reception will take place Friday, November 13, 6 to 9 p.m.

Opening December 11 in SF: “Major Work” at Chandran Gallery (Dec. 11 to Jan. 15), a show curated by Andrew Schoultz, includes new, large-scale work by Alicia McCarthy, Aaron Noble, Kelsey Brookes, Revok, James Marshall (Dalek), Sam Friedman, Eric Yahnker, Mark Dean Veca, Saber, Hilary Pecis, Tim Biskup, Eric White, Allison Schulnik, and Andrew Schoultz. An opening reception will take place Friday, December 11, 7 to 9 p.m.

Opening December 10 in SF: William T. Wiley, “& So . . . May Cuss Grate Again?” at Hosfelt Gallery (Dec. 11 to Jan. 30). An opening reception will take place Thursday, December 10, 6 to 8 p.m.

Book launch party November 30 in SF: For This Bridge Will Not Be Gray, illustrations by Tuckers Nichols, text by Dave Eggers. November 30, 6 p.m. at Books, Inc. in Opera Plaza.

Cornelius Völker, "Oysters," oil on canvas, 2004

Cornelius Völker, “Oysters,” oil on canvas, 2004

It’s fall, and that means the art galleries are hanging some of their most stunning shows of the year. This year is no exception; there’s an incredible selection of great shows up right now (and more coming). Be sure not to miss these stellar offerings:

Corneluis Völker at Hosfelt Gallery (through Jan. 2): From my recommendation published in Visual Art Source (http://bit.ly/1MC0JT2): “Cornelius Völker can make any subject enticing, as he demonstrates in this survey of work from the last fifteen years. The German artist explores the traditional genres of still life and portraiture, with a sometimes strange (or perhaps to some, humorous) twist, uniquely luscious brushwork, and lively color.” This is a tremendous show, and the artist’s first ever solo show on the West Coast. It is not to be missed.

Sandow Birk, “Imaginary Monuments” at Catharine Clark Gallery (through Jan. 2): Birk delivers again with this show of new drawings and an etching. These works are part of the ongoing Imaginary Monuments series, which Birk started in 2007. Birk combines recognizable text with imagined and fantastic imagery to create highly charged, often to the point of being humorous, works that resonate on multiple levels. Also to note, Birk’s book American Qur’an is now available for pre-sale; a copy of the book is on display with the show (complete with white gloves so that visitors can safely navigate the pages). The gallery is hosting a book release signing and holiday party November 21.

Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb, “Memory City” at Koch Gallery (through Nov. 14): From my recommendation for Visual Art Source (http://bit.ly/1HpmJZT): “Photographer couple Alex and Rebecca Norris Webb collaborated to create this body of images featuring scenes of and people in Rochester, New York. This work is inspired by the bankruptcy closure of Eastman Kodak in 2012, which was long headquartered in the city, and the impact that shutdown has had on the community. These are everyday scenes, but with such a sublime use of composition and light as to produce rich narratives and strong emotional qualities.” Simply put, these are gorgeous, emotionally rich images.

a2a434ed-6f6c-49b4-9f37-9bfd26581356Catherine Wagner, “Rome Works” at Anglim Gilbert Gallery (through Nov. 21): This new body of color photographs came out of Wagner’s Rome Prize residency at the American Academy in Rome. These bold and beautiful images explore the display, conservation, and handling of Greco-Roman statues and marbles, providing a unique, fresh approach to viewing these treasured classic artworks. There will be a reception Thursday, November 5, 5:30 to 7:30.

Upcoming! There are also several great shows opening this week, many in coordination with First Thursdays in San Francisco and First Fridays in Oakland. Here’s a selection:

Opening Friday in SF: Julian Hoeber, “The Inward Turn” at Jessica Silverman Gallery (Nov. 6 to Dec. 19). The opening reception will take place November 6, 6 to 8 p.m.

Opening Thursday in SF: Julio César Morales, “Emotional Violence” at Wendi Norris Gallery (Nov. 5 to Dec. 19). A discussion between the artist and Lucía Sanromán, director of the visual arts at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, will take place November 5, 6 to 7 p.m.; a reception will follow, 7 to 9 p.m.

Opening Friday in SF: Barry McGee, “China Boo” at Ratio 3 (Nov. 6 to Dec. 19). An opening reception will take place November 6, 6 to 8 p.m.